Our (final) front door… the interior

Tuesday, April 21st, 2015

Dear DIY Diary,

I am writing this post in anticipation of the Home Depot Installers finally installing our new front door (again) today.   Do you remember when they installed the wrong door??   The door with the door swing in the wrong direction??

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It’s been 6 weeks since that debacle and the day has finally come.  The new door arrives in a few hours…. and I’m a little nervous.   I hope that everything is right this time and that the installation goes smoothly (fingers crossed, knock on wood!).   Oh yeah, and that the installers show up on time as opposed to 4.5 hours late like last time.

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Punctuality would be sweet.   I’ve already prepped our foyer by moving out our furniture and area rug and the awesome door hardware that we purchased is sitting nearby just raring to go.  It’s noon now.  They’re scheduled to show up at 3 pm.   We’ll see how it goes.   Wish us luck!

-Christina

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Dear DIY Diary,

It’s 2:37 pm.   Joey texted to tell me that they called and are on their way.  EEEEEEEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!

-Christina

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‘Sup, Diary…

4 pm.   Just got word.  They’ve arrived.  Finally.  I suppose an hour late is an 80% improvement from last time, though.  :/

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Diary,

It’s 7pm and the new door is in.  And it’s awesome. It’s amazing to know that I can finally paint it and make it our own.

This is Christina, signing out

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So, yeah.   Door is in and after a bit of elbow grease, the interior is now a crisp, shiny white.  After it was first installed, it looked like this…

First off, THIS is the way the door was meant to be.   Having the door-swing in the correct orientation is like a breath of fresh air.   It just fits.  It makes the flow of the foyer the way it’s supposed to be.   Heck, yeah.

As for the painting process… Because the outer trim was raw wood, I decided to prime it first with shellac primer to prevent any of the wood’s oils from soaking through my finish (I like the Zinsser 1-2-3).  Here’s the door after priming the trim…

Already looking better, right?

I waited the 45 minutes recommended on the primer can, then painted the door and door frame with a foam roller and brush.  My poison paint of choice was Sherwin Williams Proclassic paint in extra white semigloss (the same paint that I used on the built-ins and wet-bar).   During the process, I asked Joey if he would take a few “action” pics of me painting.  I always like to see my favorite bloggers in action, so I thought I’d follow suit.   He obliged and snapped away as I continued to paint.  So, there I was, minding my own business, thinking that he was getting some good action shots.   And then I uploaded my pics to my computer only to discover that…

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…Men. Cannot be. Trusted.

(Okay, so I sort of laughed in defeat as I made this discovery,  And then added a tasteful “censored” sign, because why not.  But, seriously Joey… NOT relevant to the project!) 😉

Among the other non-relevant shots, he did get this one…

 

No, I did not do my hair.  Unless you count “frosting” it with paint.   Which happens EVERY.TIME.

Once I was done, the door looked like this…

Don’t you just wanna reach into the photo and softly pet that smooth, glossy surface?  Oh, yeah.

And yes, I typed those last statements in the voice of Barry White.

Seriously, though.  The Proclassic paint just leveled right out and created a nice smooth finish.  I’d marry this paint if I wasn’t already taken.

So, enough suspense already…. ya wanna see the foyer all put back together???

  

BOOM.

I love you, door.

And our foyer loves you, too.   You make it look GOOOOOD.

As for the hardware, we chose a more modern door handle to suit our new door (the outside of which you’ll see in my exterior door post)…

And I couldn’t heart it more.

A little before and after goodness…

I am so absolutely over-the-moon crazy about this door.  The entire doorway fits the house so much better stylistically.   Like it was meant to be here originally.  Which is exactly what I was going for.   In the end, I really couldn’t be happier.

Next, I’ll give you a little exterior door post.  And I’ll tell ya… exterior door painting is giving me a run for my money. I’ve got quite the what-not-to-do-post in the making, so stay tuned.

TDC Before and After
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Paint the town white

White paint for everyone!

All the things will be painted white!

All.The.Things.

At least that’s how it seems lately, anyways.   And I’m not complaining.  This lightly-shaded mayhem began with the transformation of our dining table, and now our built-ins have gotten the blanco treatment.  And there’s more to come. Just you wait.  😀

White is one of those lovely shades (remember in school when they referred to white and black as shades, rather than colors?? This has never left me. I remember the weirdest things.) Anyhoo, regardless of the verbage, white is classic, clean, and still leaves plenty of room for character to seep through while modernizing the item in question. And that was exactly my goal with the built-ins. Maintain character while modernizing and brightening the space.

As a refresher, when we purchased our home, the built-ins looked like this…

They were stained a 1970’s wood tone… and don’t even get me started on those nose-cabinets.  Not only this, the finish was a thick, high-gloss shellac that was drippy and uneven….

The instant we saw these built-ins during our initial showing, I knew they needed to be white.   They were SCREAMING for it.  And so was the fireplace.  After all, he was the showstopper of the space.  The built-ins were basically zapping him of energy, what with them matching almost perfectly.  The fireplace deserved to be the star-attraction and painting the built-ins white would allow him to fulfill his destiny.

So, after more than a few pep-talks (3monthsworth) to motivate myself, I got going.   I’ll admit, I was sort of dreading the process.  The finish used on the built-ins was super glossy and clearly oil-based.  This meant that they would require mucho prep work to ensure an even, long-lasting finish.

I started by removing all the doors and labeling them both on the door behind the hinge (because I knew I wouldn’t need to paint over it)…

I also labeled the brown paper used to protect our floors under each corresponding cabinet….

Then, I sanded.

My goal was to rough up the surface so that my primer would adhere well.  I used my orbital sander with 220 grit sandpaper and hand sanded the crevices.   I sanded the doors and shelves outside to help minimize the dust indoors….

To be on the safe side, I also wiped down the entire piece with some liquid deglosser (as shown in this old pic)….

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I simply wiped off all the dust with a few Swiffer rags first, then applied a nice, generous coat of deglosser (I just wiped it on with a lint-free rag).  Once it was dry, I carefully cleaned everything off with some tack cloth to remove any residual dust and dirt.

Next, came my favorite primer…

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Zinsser shellac primer.  It sticks to anything, prevents bleed-through like a champ, and you can topcoat it with anything.  Plus, it dries fast and can be topcoated within 45 minutes.   Ever since this experience, I’ve used this primer on any project that I’ve ever painted white and have yet to be disappointed.

Once the primer was dry, I topcoated it with this paint in Extra White Semi-gloss….

ProClassic® Interior Acrylic Latex Enamel

Now, I’ll admit, I wasn’t so kind to this paint in this post when I first tried it, but it’s grown on me.   It really is very good paint that leaves a relatively smooth finish. Plus, this one gallon has lasted me through many a project.   I ended up doing 3-4 thin and even coats with a foam roller to get everything perfectly uniform (3 on the doors, 4 on the unit).  I used a 2 1/2 inch angled brush for the crevices and to edge the units.   My favorite is the Wooster brush… it just covers so well and with great accuracy.

Once all was said and done, I let everything cure for 5 days before putting it all back together.   I usually wait at least a week to be sure, but my impatience got to me this time (baddiyer!).

So you don’t have to scroll back up, here’s the before again…

And here she is now…

This view from the dining space is now SO much brighter…

Being that it started out here..

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And this view of the living room is less brown now as well…

What’s funny is, I’d totally planned on filling in the middle hardware holes and drilling new ones at more traditional placements, but once I found the streamline knobs from Anthropologie and tried them out, I decided to keep the holes as is.

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Both Joey and I were sold.   They just looked so cool in the middle of the door.  Sleek.  Different.   Color me shocked by this revelation.

Seriously, though.  Aren’t they snazzy?  And I have to admit… I feel pretty swanky now that I own something from Anthropologie.  Heehee!  Are you impressed by my trendiness??  😉   The knobs were a bit pricier than I’m used to at $6 a pop, but they MAKE the piece.  In my eyes it was totally worth the splurge. Plus, this makeover was pretty cheap overall since I already had the paint and primer.  And I decided to reuse the original hinges since they meshed with the new knobs (which was another money-saver).

I just love how the units now contrast with the fireplace, making both elements pop in their own way…

As for styling, I tried to keep it simple to prevent the unit from becoming too busy.  I used mainly neutral colors with a few pops to tie everything in to the surrounding rooms…

I couldn’t be happier about how these built-ins turned out.   They’re light, bright, but still have some of that 1970’s charm.   And now they royally put our wet-bar to shame…

Being that this guy is on the opposite wall in the same room, he’ll be painted next to match.  And I have a fun idea to try with the counter top as well.  Things are happening, guys.   Things are happening…   😉

And now I’m signing off… Until next time!  🙂

TDC Before and After